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Bladder Infection In Dogs - Signs & What To Do

Bladder infections and other bladder issues are as common in dogs as they are in people and just as painful. In today's post our Cordova vets share the signs that your dog may have a bladder infection and what to do.

Causes of Bladder Infections in Dogs

While bladder infections are more common in female dogs any pooch can suffer from this uncomfortable condition.

If your pup is suffering from a bladder infection it could have been caused by anything from crystals or bacteria to diseases such as diabetes. Even some medications can lead to bladder issues in dogs. 

Signs of Bladder Infection in Dogs

The most common symptoms of bladder infections in dogs include pain or difficulties urinating, blood in urine or in some cases you may notice that your pup is only urinating very small amounts but frequently. Other signs of bladder infections or urinary tract infections (UTIs) include:

  • Straining to urinate
  • Increased frequency of urination
  • Blood in the urine
  • Cloudy or strong-smelling urine
  • Reduced quantity of urine
  • Accidents inside your home
  • Whimpering while urinating
  • Licking the genital area
  • Fever
  • Increased thirst
  • Lack of energy

If your pup is displaying any of the symptoms above it's time to head to the vet for an examination. Bladder infections and urinary tract infections are very uncomfortable and often painful for your dog. When caught and treated early these infections can often be cleared up quickly and easily.

Can a dog's bladder infection go away on its own?

Although in some cases bladder infections in people clear up without the need for medical care, this is unlikely to be true for your dog. It is also the case that, since our canine companions are unable to tell us how they are feeling it is best to have any symptoms of illness checked out by your vet. Left untreated your pup's bladder infection could become much more severe and lead to complications.

It could also be the case that your dog's bladder infection symptoms are due to a more serious underlying condition in need of treatment. When it comes to your pet's health it is always best to err on the side of caution.

How to Treat Bladder Infections in Dogs

Antibiotics are the primary treatment for bladder infections in dogs, although in some cases your vet may recommend anti-inflammatory medications or pain killers depending on the severity and underlying cause.

Note: The advice provided in this post is intended for informational purposes and does not constitute medical advice regarding pets. For an accurate diagnosis of your pet's condition, please make an appointment with your vet. 

If your pooch is showing signs of a bladder infection it's time to head to the vet. Contact our Cordova vets at Germantown Parkway Animal Hospital today to book an examination for your four-legged friend.

If your dog needs more trips outside, it could be a sign that they have a bladder infection. Cordova Vet

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