Skip to Main Content

Why should my pet have a fecal exam?

The best way to ensure that your pet and your household are safe from intestinal parasites is with annual routine fecal exams. Your vet can use fecals to check your pet for intestinal parasites which are otherwise difficult to detect. Here, our Memphis vets explain more.


What is a fecal exam?

Done at the veterinary office, a fecal is the microscopic exam of your pet's feces.  Fecal's are done to in order to identify and treat any infections that could be compromising your pet's health, or even your family's health.

What do fecals detect?

Fecals are used to help your vet to determine if your pet has intestinal parasites such as hookworms or roundworms. Not only can these parasites make pets uncomfortable and irritable, but they can also lead to more serious conditions. Some parasites can even be transmitted to people.

These parasites are often hidden from view because they live in your pet’s gastrointestinal tract. That's why, the only way to detect them is with a fecal exam done by your vet.

How do I prepare for my pet's fecal?

In order to get the most accurate results, you should collect a fresh stool sample and bring it to your vet within 4 to 6 hours of collecting it.

It's important to get the sample to the vet within the 4 -6 hours since drying out and dehydrating kills many of the potential parasites present, which could mask their presence in the sample.

How often does my pet need a fecal?

It is recommended that all pets be tested for parasites at least once a year. More frequent fecals may be required for puppies and animals with gastrointestinal issues. Ask your vet how often you should bring in your pet’s stool sample for testing.

Fecal exams are part of our annual Wellness Plans. Choose the Wellness Plan that's right for your pet.

Looking for a vet in Cordova and greater Memphis area?

We're always accepting new patients, so contact our veterinary hospital today to book your pet's first appointment.

Contact Us

Related Articles View All

Reverse Sneeze in Dogs - What It Is & When to be Concerned

If your dog suddenly stops, extends their neck, and lets out a strange snorting sound - there's a good chance that you have just witnessed a reverse sneeze. It can be alarming to witness a reverse sneeze but it's fairly common in small dogs. Our Cordova vets explain.

My dog has hurt their paw pad. What should I do?

Much like the bottoms of your own feet, your dog's paw pads are generally pretty tough. Nonetheless painful cuts, scapes and injuries can still occur. Below, our Cordova vets offer some helpful tips on how to care for your dog's paw if they cut one of their paw pads.

Anal Gland Disease in Dogs

If your dog 'scooting' or having difficulties passing stool anal sac disease may be the cause. Our Cordova vets explain the causes, symptoms and treatments for this uncomfortable condition commonly seen in dogs.

How to Care for a Dog Wound

Not every cut or graze your dog gets requires veterinary care, but you do need to know how to care for your dog's wounds, and when you should head to the vet. Here, our Cordova emergency vets provide tips on how to care for your dog's wounds at home.

PhoneContact